Northern Israel Cultural Tour

Northern Israel Cities:

Jerusalem

Holon

Tel Aviv

Ramat Gan

Petach Tikva

Netanya

Umm al-Fahm

Caesarea

Ein Hod

Ein Harod

Haifa

Kibbutz Ga’aton

 

Jerusalem

Abu Gosh Vocal Music Festival—Music

Credit: The Abu-Gosh Festival

The Abu Gosh Festival was established in 1992. It takes place twice a year, on Sukkot and Shavuot, and lasts between three to five days. The concerts are performed in two churches: the Crusader-Benedictine Church, built in the 12th century and located in the center of the village, and the Kiryat Ye’arim Church, which looks over Abu Gosh from a nearby hilltop. Hanna Tzur has been the Music Director of the Abu Gosh Festival since 1995, and served as Music Director of the Ramat-Gan Chamber Choir for 19 years.

Website: http://www.agfestival.co.il/en

Visitor Information: Tickets are available during the festival at the box office in the churches. Only cash is accepted.

 

Bridge of Strings—Architectural Site

Designed by Spanish architect and engineer Santiago Calatrava, the Bridge of Strings, also known as the Chords Bridge, is used for pedestrian traffic and Jerusalem Light Rail’s Red Line. The most prominent feature of the bridge is the 118-meter mast that is bolstered by 66 cables. It is built mainly of Jerusalem stone, with trimmings of glass, steel, and concrete, and is the tallest structure in Jerusalem. The bridge was completed in 2008.

Website: https://www1.jerusalem.muni.il/jer_sys/publish/showPublish.asp?pub_id=29678    

Visitor Information: Walking across the Bridge of Strings is free, and tickets are not required.

Street Address: Jaffa St, Jerusalem

 

Beit Knesset HaGadol (Great Synagogue)—Architectural Site

Designed by German-born architect Dr. Alexander Friedman, the Great Synagogue opened on August 4, 1982. The ancient Temple inspired the building’s architectural style. The Main Sanctuary seats 1,400 and is acoustically engineered to maximize sound capacity. Régine Heim-Freudenreich of Switzerland designed the huge stained glass windows above the Aron Kodesh. The synagogue is dedicated to the memory of the six million Jews who perished in the Holocaust, and to all who have sacrificed their lives for the establishment of the State of Israel.

Website: https://www.jerusalemgreatsynagogue.com/

Visitor Information: Minyan occurs several times throughout the day. Tours (approximately 30 minutes): Sunday-Thursday, 9am-1pm. Please note that all “visitors must be appropriately attired.”

Street Address: King George Street 56, Jerusalem

 

Hurva Synagogue—Architectural Site

The Hurva Synagogue (“The Ruin Synagogue”), was newly rebuilt in 2010 in the Jewish Quarter of the Old City. Originally founded by followers of Yehuda Ha-Chassid in the early 1700s, the synagogue was demolished in 1721 and then rebuilt in 1864. From this point to 1948, when the Arab Legion destroyed it again, the Hurva synagogue was Jerusalem’s primary Ashkenazi synagogue, as well as the tallest Jewish landmark in Jerusalem. Architect Nahum Meltzer reconstructed the building in 2010. He rebuilt the structure in the 19th century style in the hopes of recapturing the synagogue’s original magnificence.

Website: http://bit.ly/HurvaSynagogue 

Visitor Information: Minyan occurs several times throughout the day. Guided audio tours of the synagogue are available Sunday-Thursday, 9am-1pm

Tour prices: Adult: 20 NIS (in group of 20+ individuals: 17 NIS each). Child/Student/Soldier/Disabled/Israeli citizen: 10 NIS (in group of 20+ individuals: 9 NIS each)

Street Address: Ha-Yehudim St, Jerusalem

 

International Convention Center—Music

The International Convention Center, known as Binyanei Ha’uma, is the largest convention center in the Middle East. It has hosted many international events, including the Eurovision Song Contest 1999. Its Menachem Ussishkin auditorium seats 3,104.

Website: http://iccjer.co.il/Index.aspx?l=2

Visitor information: Ticketing varies for each event. See website for details.

Street Address: Sderot Shazar 1, Jerusalem, 9106001

 

Israel Museum—Fine Arts

The Israel Museum, founded in 1965, holds many remarkable objects, including the interior of a 1736 Zedek ve Shalom synagogue from Suriname; necklaces worn by Jewish brides in Yemen; a mosaic of an Islamic prayer niche from 17th-century Persia; and a nail attesting to the practice of crucifixion in Jesus’ time. The museum’s Shrine of the Book, which is shaped like a large white urn, houses the Dead Sea Scrolls (the world’s oldest biblical manuscripts) and other artifacts discovered at Masada. The Edmond and Lily Safra Fine Arts Wing includes European Art; Modern Art; Contemporary Art; Israeli Art; the Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas; Asian Art; Photography; Design and Architecture; and Prints and Drawings. The Israel Museum is the country’s largest cultural institution and one of the world’s leading art and archaeology museums.

Website: https://www.imj.org.il/en/

Visitor Information:
Hours: SMWTh: 10 am-5 pm
              Tuesday: 4-9 pm
              Friday and Holiday Eves: 10 am-2 pm
              Saturday and Holidays: 10 am-5 pm
Entrance fee: Adult: 54 NIS. Student: 39 NIS

Guided tours are available in a variety of languages, including English, Hebrew, Spanish, French, and Russian

Street Address: Ruppin Blvd. 11

 

Israel Musicals—Theater

Founded in 2007, Israel Musicals brings classic musical theater to an Israeli audience. The productions are performed in English with Hebrew subtitles.

Website: http://www.israel-theatre.com/

Visitor Information: See website for information regarding tickets for upcoming productions.

Street Address: POB 85321, Mevaseret Zion, 90805

 

The Jerusalem Artists’ House—Fine Arts

Since its founding in 1965, the Jerusalem Artists’ House has served as home to the Association for Jerusalem Artists. In conjunction with this role, the House hosts exhibitions highlighting the work of Israeli and international artists. The Artists’ House also puts on varied group exhibitions and joint presentations between Israeli and international artists, among other activities.

Website: http://www.art.org.il/?lang=en

Visitor Information:

General Hours:
MWTh: 10 am– 6 pm
Tuesday: 2 pm–8 pm
Friday: 10 am–1pm
Saturday: 11 am–2 pm
Sunday: closed

Hanagid Gallery Hours:
MTTh: 10am-1pm, 4pm-7pm
Friday: 10am-1pm
Saturday: 11am-2pm
Sunday: 4pm-7pm

Street Address: Shmuel Hanagid 12, Jerusalem

 

Jerusalem International Chamber Music Festival—Music

The Jerusalem International Chamber Music Festival, which began in September 1988, occurs annually at the YMCA Jerusalem. The festival features a wide variety of chamber music repertoire, including works by living Israeli composers.

Website: http://www.jcmf.org.il/index.php?p=&l=eng

Visitor Information:
Concert Ticket Prices: 7 concerts: 1020 NIS; 5 concerts: 770 NIS; Single concert: 170 NIS; Students: 60 NIS; Soldiers: Free entrance; Last minute tickets (1 hour before): 100 NIS

Hours:
Sunday – Thursday: 10:00am-2:00pm, 4:00pm-8:00pm
Friday: 10:00am-1:00pm

Street address: King David 26, Jerusalem, 91002

 

Jerusalem International YMCA—Architectural Site

Arthur Louis Harmon, designer of the Empire State Building, was the architect for the Jerusalem International YMCA, which was completed in 1933. The building was constructed with a vision of unity among different religious groups, as reflected in its diverse design inspirations. The building combines Byzantine, Gothic, neo-Moorish and Romanesque architecture. 

Website: http://ymca.org.il/

Visitor Information:
Bell tower: Single admission: 15 NIS. Group (10+ people): 10 NIS. Family (1+ adult and 2+ children under 13 years of age, up to 5 people total): 40 NIS

The Three Arches Hotel: http://www.ymca3arches.com/

The YMCA’s Three Arches Hotel includes standard rooms as well as suites. Hotel amenities include a sports center, sauna, and conference center.

YMCA Restaurant: Open daily from Midday-10pm

Street address: King David 26, Jerusalem, 91002

 

The Jerusalem Opera—Music

The Jerusalem Opera, established in 2011, has presented six full opera productions: Don Giovanni, The Marriage of Figaro, Madame Butterfly, The Barber of Seville, The Magic Flute and Hansel and Gretel. The company aims to provide a platform for the promotion of Jerusalem and Israeli artists, especially young artists.

Website: https://www.jerusalemopera.com/

Visitor Information: See website for ticketing information for upcoming productions.

Street address: 26 Caspi Str., Jerusalem 9355429

 

Jerusalem Symphony Orchestra—Music

The JSO was founded as the Palestine Broadcasting Service Orchestra in the late 1930s, and became the Kol Israel Orchestra in 1948. Its current music director is Maestro Frédéric Chaslin. The orchestra’s varied repertoire ranges from the Baroque and the Classical periods through the Romantic period, and includes contemporary works. The JSO has presented the Israeli premieres of several works by notable living composers. The orchestra has toured throughout Europe and the United States.

Website: http://www.jso.co.il/en/

Visitor Information: Tickets:  Single concert 155-175 NIS; Single concert, The Vocal Series: 160-180 NIS; Single concert, The Family Series: 80-100 NIS; Open subscription (4 concerts): 380-520 NIS; Open Subscription (6 concerts): 560-780 NIS; The Soloist Series (10 concerts): 840-1060 NIS; The Conductors Series (11 concerts): 930-1290 NIS; The Popular Series (9 concerts): 750-1050 NIS; The Family Series (5 concerts): 300-425 NIS

Street Address: The Henry Crown Symphony Hall, The Jerusalem Theater, Chopin St. 5

 

Jerusalem Theatre, aka The Jerusalem Center for the Performing Arts—Music

Credit: Yair Haklai

The Jerusalem Theatre opened in 1971. The complex consists of the Sherover Theatre (950 seats), the Henry Crown Symphony Hall (750 seats), the Rebecca Crown Auditorium (450 seats), and the Little Theatre (110 seats). Changing art exhibits are held in the main foyer and other spaces in the building, and a restaurant and bookshop operate on the ground floor.

Website: https://www.jerusalem-theatre.co.il/Default.aspx?Lang=En

Visitor Information:
Box Office Hours: Sunday-Thursday: 9:30am-7:30pm and Friday: 9:30am-1pm

Street Address: 20 Marcus Street, P.O. Box 4072, Jerusalem 91040

 

Kalman Sultanik Confederation House—Music

Confederation House, a center for ethnic music and poetry, emphasizes innovation in ethnic music and poetry both in Israel and abroad. The institution also promotes the cultural activity of Ethiopian olim immigrants. Effie Benaya has served as the Confederation House’s general and artistic director for twenty years, over which period the House has become one of Israel’s most influential musical institutions. Confederation House embraces diversity through the heterogeneous genres and styles performed there, as well as the diverse ethnic backgrounds of the performers themselves. The House’s aim is to develop cultural pluralism throughout Israel.

Website: http://www.confederationhouse.org/

Visitor Information: See website for ticket information for upcoming performances and festivals.

Street address: 12 Emile Botta St., P.O. Box 7218, Jerusalem 9107102

 

Khan Theatre—Theater

The Khan Theatre is the only producing repertoire-theater in Jerusalem and is one of the leading repertoire-theatres in the country. The theatre produces six new shows annually. Artistic director Michael Gurevitch selects the repertoire, and also writes and directs some of the theatre’s shows. The company works together to devise new productions.

Website: https://khan.co.il/language/en/homepage/

Visitor Information: See website for ticketing information for upcoming productions, or call 02-6303600 ext. 1.

Street Address: 2 David Remez St

 

Knesset—Architectural Site

In 1955, the Israeli government approved plans to build the Knesset in its current location. James de Rothschild agreed to finance its construction. Joseph Klarwein won the competition to design the Knesset building in 1957. Detractors complained that Klarwein’s plan was boring, not Israeli, and not sufficiently modern. The planners, however, believed the plan to be reminiscent of the Greek Acropolis, a nod to Grecian glory.

Website: https://knesset.gov.il/main/eng/home.asp

Visitor Information: Tours are offered free of charge, and occur Sundays and Thursdays. Only groups of 10 or more must reserve a tour in advance. A passport or Israeli ID card must be presented to enter the Knesset. Tour timing depends on preferred language: Hebrew: 10:00am, 11:00am, 1:00pm; German: 8:30am; English: 8:30am, 12:00pm, 2:00pm; Spanish: 10:00am; Russian: 11:00am; French: 1:00pm; Arabic: 1:00pm. Specific tours for children are also available.

Members of the public may also view the Knesset Plenum from the Visitors Gallery on Mondays and Tuesdays at 4pm, and on Wednesdays at 11am.

Street Address: Kiryat Ben Gurion, Jerusalem 91950

 

Memorial Hall, Har Herzl—Architectural Site

Credit: Amit Geron

Kimmel Eshkolot Architects designed the memorial to Israel’s fallen soldiers at the country’s national cemetery in Jerusalem. The memorial includes over 23,000 bricks, each of which is engraved with the name of a fallen soldier and the date of their death. This “wall of names” spirals around the memorial’s central commemoration hall. Natural light passes into the roofless space and is filtered though the bricks, so that no artificial light is needed during the day.

Website: http://www.mod.gov.il/Memorial_Legacy/Pages/National_hall_of_remembrance.aspx

Visitor Information:
Hours:
Sunday-Thursday: 9am-6pm
Friday: 9am-12pm

Tours are offered free of charge, but must be organized in advance. A full 1.5-hour version is offered, as well as a shorter 45-minute version.

Street Address: Mount Herzl, POB 16590, Jerusalem 9116402

 

Museum for Islamic Art—Fine Arts

The Museum for Islamic Art in Jerusalem, which opened in 1974, is committed to the collection, preservation and exhibition of art objects and archaeological artifacts that represent Islamic art between the 7th and 19th centuries. The museum hopes to connect Muslim and Jewish cultures, and believes that its primary goal is to cultivate cultural dialogue. It is also known for its vast collection of antique watches, which became famous in 1983 when professional burglar Naaman Diller stole 100, valued at $204 million, from the exhibition. (They were returned in 2004.)

Website: http://www.islamicart.co.il/english/

Visitor Information:
Entrance Fees:  Adult: 40 NIS; Israeli Senior: 20 NIS; Child: 20 NIS; “Yerushalmi” card-holder: 30 NIS

Hours: Monday-Wednesday: 10:00am-3:00pm
Thursday: 10:00am-7:00pm
Friday-Saturday: 10:00-2:00pm

Street Address: 2 Hapalmach St.

 

Theatre Company Jerusalem—Theater

Credit: Yael Ilan

Theatre Company Jerusalem produces contemporary theater inspired by ancient Hebrew and Aramaic writing and song. This fringe theater group aims to reclaim women’s voices in Jewish sources through the performing arts. The company performs in Israel and all over the world in Hebrew and English.

Website: http://www.tcj.org.il/

Visitor Information: See website for details regarding ticketing for upcoming productions.

 

Umberto Nahon Museum of Italian Jewish Art—Fine Arts

Founded in 1983, the Umberto Nahon Museum of Italian Jewish Art collects, preserves, and displays objects pertaining to Jewish life in Italy from the Renaissance through today. It is the world’s only museum dedicated to the collection of artistic objects from all of Italy’s Jewish communities.

Website: http://ijamuseum.org/

Visitor Information:
Hours: Sunday-Wednesday: 10:30am-4:30pm
Thursday: 12:00pm-7:00pm

The museum offers group tours and custom-made programs upon request.

Street Address: 25 Hillel Street

 

Vertigo Dance Company—Dance

Noa Wertheim and Adi Sha’al founded Vertigo Dance Company in 1992. The inspiration for the dance company’s name came from Sha’al’s personal experience with the sensation of vertigo during his years in the air force. The contemporary dance company aims for its works to challenge the viewer, and sees itself as a representative of Israeli art at its best. All of Vertigo’s works, especially the two most recent, Mana and White Noise, have achieved worldwide recognition and success. In addition to performances, Vertigo gives regular master classes and workshops.

Website: https://vertigo.org.il/en/

Visitor Information: See website for ticketing information for upcoming performances.

Street Address: Gerared Behar Center, 11 Bezalel St

 

Ashdod:

Ashdod Museum of Art—Fine Arts

The Ashdod Museum of Art was founded in 2003, but only recognized officially by the State of Israel in 2009. The museum, which specializes in Israeli and international contemporary art, includes 12 galleries and two halls. The museum’s Mishbetzet gallery exhibits original works by Israeli artists for children’s education. The museum’s underground vault was used to protect the works of Tsibi Geva during the 2014 Israel-Gaza conflict. Yuval Biton is the museum’s current curator.

Website: http://www.ashdodartmuseum.org.il/he

Visitor Information:
Hours: Sunday, Wednesday-Friday: 9:00am-4:00pm
Tuesday: 9:00am-8pm

Street Address: Derech Erets 8, Ashdod, 77154, Israel

 

Holon

Design Museum Holon—Fine Arts

Established in 2010, the Design Museum Holon intends to inspire and challenge perceptions of design’s role in daily life. Each year the Museum presents an exciting and varied program of exhibitions and events. The city of Holon, under the direction of Mayor Moti Sasson and Managing Director Hana Hertsman, chose renowned architect Ron Arad to create the museum building. Its unique structure provides visitors with an immersive environment for exploring the world of design.

Website: http://www.dmh.org.il/default.aspx

Visitor Information:
Hours: Monday: 10:00am-4:00pm
Tuesday, Thursday: 10:00am-6:00pm
Friday: 10:00am-2:00pm
Saturday: 10:00am-6:00pm

Entrance fee:  ‏‏Adults: 35 NIS; Youth (11-17): 30 NIS; Children (5-10): 20 NIS; Family (2 adults & 2 children): 120 NIS; Soldiers/Disabled Veterans /National Service Volunteers: 28 NIS; Holon Residents/Students /Visitors with Disabilities: 30 NIS; Israeli Senior Citizens: 17 NIS

Street Address: Pinhas Eilon St. 8

 

The Israeli Cartoon Museum—Fine Arts

A first of its kind in the country, the Israeli Cartoon Museum provides a permanent platform for cartoon artists, caricaturists and comics lovers. The museum exposes visitors to a variety of cartoons and works of caricature in hopes of promoting a better understanding of caricatures in society. The museum is part of the Mediatheque, a cultural complex in Holon.

Website: http://www.cartoon.org.il/

Visitor Information:
Hours: Monday, Wednesday: 10:00am – 1:00pm
Tuesday, Thursday: 5:00pm – 8:00pm
Saturday: 10:00am – 3:00pm

Entrance fee: Adult: 15 NIS; Senior Citizens (with ID): 10 NIS; Students & Soldiers (with ID):  7 NIS; Children (5 and under): Free

Street Address: Haim Weizzman 61

 

The Israeli Centre for Digital Art—Fine Arts

Founded in 2001, the Israeli Centre for Digital Art works to research, produce, present, and analyze contemporary art. In an effort to stimulate discourse in Israeli society, the center devotes a significant part of its work to art projects that foster questions about identity, ethnicity, nationalism and cultural exchange. The activities of the center include its video archive, public presentations, a residency program, publications, and education.

Website: http://bit.ly/DigitalArtLab 

Visitor Information:
Hours: Tuesday: 4:00pm-8:00pm
Wednesday, Thursday: 2:00pm-6:00pm
Saturday: 11:00am-3:00pm

Street Address: Yermiyahu 16

 

The Museum of Puppet Theater Art—Fine Arts

The Museum of Puppet Theater Art is the only museum of its kind in Israel and one of the only ones in the world. Its permanent collection features dozens of traditional and contemporary puppets and masks from Israel and abroad. The museum also hosts temporary exhibitions devoted to special types of puppets, stage artists, and photographic media from Israel and abroad.

Website: http://www.puppetcenter.co.il/

Visitor information: Entrance fee: 5 NIS. Guided tours begin at 10:30am, and conclude at noon. Taking the tour with one adult and one child on the tour costs 75 NIS, and each individual child is a 40 NIS fee.

Street Address: David Remez St 13

 

Tel Aviv

The Arab-Hebrew Theatre of Jaffa—Theater

The Arab-Hebrew Theatre of Jaffa, founded in 1998, includes two theatrical groups that produce plays together and apart in Hebrew and Arabic. The theater hosts three major festivals each year: The Jaffa Children’s Festival, Theatroneto, and The Festival of Arab Culture.

Website: http://www.arab-hebrew-theatre.org.il/

Visitor Information: See website for ticket information for upcoming productions.

Street Address: 10 Mifratz Shlomo Promenade

 

Barak Marshall Dance Theatre—Dance

Credit: Ricardo Miranda

Barak Marshall is seen as one of Israel’s most innovate creators of dance. Marshall’s first work, Aunt Leah, won first prize in Suzanne Dellal’s 1995 Shades of Dance Choreography Competition. Shortly after, he premiered his second work, The Land of Sad Oranges, based on a story by Palestinian writer Ghassan Kanafani. Marhsall’s third work, Emma Goldman’s Wedding, represented Israel in the 1998 Bagnolet International Competition where it won the first prize, as well as the Prix d’Auteur Award, the Bonnie Byrd Award for New Choreography, and the National ADAMI Award. Marshall has also choreographed for the Batsheva Ensemble, the Philadanco Dance Company, MDT Dance Company and Austria’s ABCD Dance Company. Since 2008, Marshall’s works have been presented over 800 times all over the world.

Website: http://www.barakmarshall.com/

Visitor Information: See website for ticket information for upcoming productions.

 

Batsheva Dance Company—Dance

Credit: Laurent Philippe

Batsheva Dance Company has been critically acclaimed as one of the world’s most exciting contemporary dance companies. Internationally acclaimed choreographer Ohad Naharin (subject of the recent documentary Mr. Gaga) led the company from 1990-September 2018, at which point longtime company member and former rehearsal director Gili Navot became artistic director. Together with its junior Batsheva Ensemble, the company tours extensively throughout the country and internationally, performing 250 times annually. The company holds residency in the Suzanne Dellal Centre for Dance and Theatre in Tel Aviv.

Website: https://batsheva.co.il/en/home

Visitor Information: See website for ticket information for upcoming performances.

Street Address: Yehieli St 5, Tel Aviv-Yafo, 6514946

 

Bauhaus Center: Tel Aviv White City Bauhaus Tour—Architectural Site

The Bauhaus Center specializes in tours of Tel Aviv’s “White City” Bauhaus Architecture. This German style of architecture, which originated in Weimar in 1919, is characterized by simple, straightforward design with an industrial, minimalist aesthetic. In 2003, UNESCO proclaimed Tel Aviv’s White City a World Cultural Heritage site. This 2-hour tour shows the city’s most prominent Bauhaus buildings, constructed during the 1930s and 1940s.

Website: http://www.bauhaus-center.com/

Visitor InformationWeekly guided tours in English start Fridays at 10am. Audio guides are available daily in English, Hebrew, Russian, German, French, and Italian. Audio guides and the live tour each cost 80 NIS per person. Private tours are available on request.

Hours: Sunday-Thursday: 10:00am-7:00pm
Friday: 10:00am-2:30pm
Saturday: 10:00am-7:30pm

Street Address: 77 Dizengoff St.

 

Beit Bialik—Architectural Site

Credit: Gellerj

Beit Bialik was the short-lived home of Israel’s national poet, Haim Nahman Bialik. Joseph Minor, a student of Alexander Baerwald (who designed the Technion University campus), was the building’s architect. The house, which was completed in 1925, is considered a classic example of the Hebrew style of architecture. The structure includes a tower, outdoor terraces, domes, pointed-arch windows and extensive tile work replicating the designs of Ze’ev Raban (1890-1970), a pioneer in the field of Israeli architecture.

Website: https://beithair.org/he/bialik_house

Visitor Information: Tours (1 hour and 15 minutes long) can be coordinated for groups of 15 or more.

Entrance fee: Adults: 25 NIS; Students/ retirees: 15 NIS

Street Address: Bialik St. 22

 

Beit Hatfutsot—Fine Arts

The Museum of the Jewish People at Beit Hatfutsot strives to strengthen Jewish identity by connecting all Jewish visitors to their heritage.  It showcases the fascinating narrative of the Jewish people and the essence of Jewish culture and faith. Since its founding in 1978, the museum has aimed to nurture a sense of belonging among its diverse Jewish visitors. The museum is currently rebuilding in an effort to position itself as a cutting-edge museum and cultural center for years to come.

Website: https://www.bh.org.il/

Visitor Information:
Hours: Sunday-Wednesday: 10:00am-7:00pm
Thursday: 10:00am-10:30pm
Friday: 9:00am-2:00pm
Saturday: 10:00am-3:00pm

Ticket Prices: Adults: 49 NIS; Children: 49 NIS; Olim: 24 NIS; Soldiers: 24 NIS; Children under 5: free entrance; Soldiers in uniform: free entrance

Street Address: Klausner 15, Tel Aviv-Yafo, 61392

 

Beit Lessin—Theater 

Credit: Talmoryair

Founded in the early 1980s as the Histadrut’s cultural club, Beit Lessin is now one of Israel’s largest repertory theaters. Beit Lessin, which is named after an almost forgotten Yiddish author, presents ten premieres annually and has over 30,000 subscribers in Tel Aviv. Zippi Pines started managing the theater in 1993. It has separated from the Histadrut (Israel’s trade union, founded in 1920) and shows mostly original Israeli material that reflects Israel’s political and social situation. The theater’s production Mikveh won the Israeli Theater Prize in 2005.

Website: https://www.lessin.co.il/

Visitor Information: See website for ticketing information for current productions.

Street Address: Weizmann St 60

 

The Center for Contemporary Art (CCA)—Fine Arts

Credit: Maya Dunietz, Thicket, 2015–16

The Center for Contemporary Art was founded in 1998 to promote Israeli contemporary art. In conjunction with this goal, the CCA preserves an archive of video pieces by Israeli and international artists that includes works from the 1960s to the present. In November 2005, the CCA moved to a new building at the Rachel and Israel Pollak Gallery in the center of Tel Aviv.

Website: http://www.cca.org.il/

Visitor Information:
Hours: Monday – Thursday: 2:00pm – 7:00pm
Friday, Saturday: 10:00am – 2:00pm

Entrance fee: 10 NIS

Street Address: Tsadok ha-Cohen St 2a

 

Clipa Theater—Dance

Actor and musician Dmitry Tyulpanov and dancer, director, and choreographer Idit Herman established Clipa Theater in 1995. The two performers created a unique performance language that combines theater, dance, design, and music. The resulting work is defined as Total Theater, in which the creators have complete control over all aspects of a show: movement, use of space, set design, costumes, sound, lighting and direction.

Website: http://www.clipa.co.il/en/

Visitor Information: See website for ticketing information for upcoming productions.

Street Address: HaRakevet St 38, Tel Aviv-Yafo, 6777006

 

Cymbalista Synagogue—Architectural Site

Credit: Michael Jacobs

This unique synagogue, built in 1998, is part of a series of religious works designed by Mario Botta. The structure’s cylinders emerging from a rectangular entrance floor symbolizes the chuppa. The Cymbalista Syngogogue, like much of Botta’s work, is made of brick. The building’s interior is flooded with natural light through its distinctive geometric shapes.

Website: https://heritage.tau.ac.il/about

Visitor Information: The synagogue is open for minyan several times a day. The synagogue Beit Midrash is open Sunday-Thursday, 9:00am-5:00pm.

Street Address: University Campus, Tel Aviv-Yafo 69978

 

Dvir Gallery—Fine Arts

Credit: David Maljkovic, 2017, Exhibition view, Dvir Gallery Tel Aviv

For over twenty years, Dvir Gallery has specialized in contemporary art and represented Israeli artists nationally and abroad. It also has a gallery in Brussels.

Website: http://dvirgallery.com/

Visitor Information:
Gallery Hours: Tuesday-Thursday: 11:00am-6:00pm
Friday-Saturday 10:00am-1:00pm

Street Address: Reshit Hochma st. 14

 

Ensemble Itim—Theater

Director and choreographer Rina Yerushalmi and stage designer Moshe Sternfeld founded Ensemble Itim in 1989. The group is now regarded as Israel’s leading experimental theater group. The Ensemble’s productions are all based on Rina Yerushalmi’s adaptations of canonical plays or non-dramatic texts. The Ensemble’s most renowned projects to date include Hamlet (1989), Woyzeck ’91 (1991), Romeo and Juliet (1993), The Bible Project (1995/1998), Mythos (2002), The Three Sisters (2004), and A Midsummer Night’s Dream (2006).

Website: https://cameri.co.il/en/ansanbel

Visitor Information: See website for information regarding tickets for current productions.

Street Address: 19 Shaul Hamelech

 

Gesher Theatre—Theater

The performers at Gesher Theatre, which was founded in 1991, are mostly Russian immigrants. Yevgeny Arye, Gesher Theatre’s Founder and Artistic Director, was a reputable and successful stage and screen director in Moscow, where he received several artistic prizes. Gesher Theatre is one of the only bi-lingual theaters in the world, performing with the same ensemble in Russian and in Hebrew. Gesher Theatre’s uniqueness can also be attributed to its method of combining the traditional principles of Russian theater with an innovative approach.

Website: http://www.gesher-theatre.co.il/en/

Visitor Information: See website for ticketing information for upcoming productions.

Street Address: 03-5157000 Yerushalaim Blvd.

 

HaCameri Theatre of Tel Aviv—Theater

Founded in 1944, HaCameri is Tel Aviv’s Municipal Theatre and one of the biggest theatres in Israel. HaCameri stages up to ten new productions each year, alongside twenty productions from previous years. The theater was awarded the Israel Prize for Lifetime Achievement and Special Contribution to Society and the State of Israel in 2005.

Website: http://www.cameri.co.il/en/

Visitor Information: See website for ticketing details for current productions.

Street Address: 19 Shaul Hamelech

 

Habima Theater—Theater

Credit: David Bauminger

The Habima Theater is the national theater of Israel and one of the first Hebrew language theaters in the world.  Nahum Zemach founded Habima in Białystok (then Grodno Governorate, Russia) in 1912. The theater company moved to British Mandate Palestine in 1928. Its Tel Aviv theater was constructed in 1945. Habima has been officially considered the national theater of Israel since 1958, the year in which it received the first ever Israel Prize for theater.

Website: https://www.habima.co.il   

Visitor Information: See website for ticketing details for current productions.

Street Address: Tarsat Boulevard 2

 

Hasimta Theater—Theater

Credit: Reuvenssrr

Hasimta Theater is a fringe theater located in the old city of Jaffa. It is one of the oldest fringe theaters in Israel, as it has been operating continuously since Niko Nitai founded it in 1982. The theater, which is active nearly every day of the year, serves as a rehearsal hall in the morning and a stage for performances in the evening. The theater houses over 54 productions and over 200 plays annually, and maintains a team of approximately 135 actors and 96 creators.

Website: http://www.hasimta.com/

Visitor Information: See website for ticketing information

Street Address: Mazal Dagim St 8

 

Herzliya Museum of Contemporary Art—Fine Arts

The Herzliya Museum of Contemporary Art, which was established in 1965, is dedicated to Israeli and international contemporary art. The museum focuses on contemporary cultural and social issues, encouraging viewers to create connections between local and international artists, emphasizing art’s power to cross boundaries and encourage multicultural dialogue. The museum’s annual program includes three cycles of exhibitions which offer diverse perspectives on our world. It does not have a permanent collection.

Website: http://www.herzliyamuseum.co.il/en/

Visitor Information:
Hours: Monday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday: 10:00am– 2:00pm
Tuesdays and Thursdays: 2:00pm-8:00pm
Guided tours are giving each Saturday at noon at no cost.

Street Address: Habanim 4

 

Ilana Goor Museum—Fine Arts

The Ilana Goor Museum, founded in 1995, boasts an eclectic artistic collection. The museum’s building was originally erected in 1742 as an inn for Jewish pilgrims traveling to Jerusalem, and has also been used as an olive oil soap factory and synagogue. The museum has a collection of more than 500 works of art, either created by Ilana Goor, who describes her artistic style as unbound by conventional classification, or collected by her.

Website: https://www.ilanagoormuseum.org/en/

Visitor Information:
Hours: Sunday-Friday: 10:00am- 4:00pm
Saturdays and holidays: 10:00 am-5:00 pm
Holiday eves: 10:00 am-2:00 pm

Entrance fee:  Adult: 30 NIS; Citizen of Tel-Aviv/Soldier/Senior/Student: 25 NIS; Child (aged 5 to 17): 20 NIS; Family ticket (up to five visitors): 75 NIS

Street Address: 4 Mazal Dagim St

 

Inbal Pinto & Avshalom Pollak Dance Company​—Dance

Credit: A. Pollak

Inbal Pinto and Avshalom Pollak founded their dance company in 1992, and have since choreographed, directed, and designed many award-winning dance performances for their company that have been presented in Israel and abroad. The company consists of 12 dancer/actors working together to connect various artistic disciplines.

Website: http://www.inbalpinto.com/

Visitor Information: See website for ticketing information for upcoming productions.

Street Address: 7 HaAchim Mislavita

 

Israeli Ballet—Dance

The Israeli Ballet, created in 1967, is Israel’s only company that performs the great classical and neo-classical ballets. Berta Yampolsky and Hillel Markman, who founded the company, continue to be its Artistic Directors. The Israeli Ballet’s repertoire includes works by George Balanchine, Berta Yampolsky, and other leading international choreographers. The company performs full-length ballets such as Giselle, The Sleeping Beauty, Don Quixote, The Nutcracker, Romeo and Juliet, and Cinderella.

Website: http://www.iballet.co.il/

Visitor Information: See website for ticketing information for upcoming productions.

 

The Israel Chamber Orchestra—Music

Gary Bertini founded the Israel Chamber Orchestra in 1965 as the “Chamber Ensemble.”  The orchestra tours throughout Israel and North America. Ariel Zuckerman is the current conductor and music director.

Website: https://www.ico.co.il/en

Visitor Information:

Ticket information: Full subscription: 1200 NIS (Repeat subscription: 995 NIS); Partial subscription: 980 NIS (Repeat subscription: 840 NIS); Taster subscription: 750 NIS (Repeat subscription: 625 NIS); Fantasia Children Series: 250 NIS (Repeat subscription: 210 NIS); Single Evening Concert: 185 NIS; Single Children’s Concert: 75 NIS; Students and people with disabilities are eligible for 50% off the full price.

Street Address: She’erit Israel Street 35

 

Israel Philharmonic Orchestra—Music

Established in 1936 as the Palestine Symphony, the IPO is Israel’s premier classical ensemble.  The great Polish-born Jewish violinist and musician Bronislaw Huberman was prescient enough to foresee the Holocaust, and persuaded 75 Jewish musicians from major European orchestras to immigrate to modern-day Israel, thus founding the iconic orchestra. Today, the orchestra performs regularly in its Tel Aviv home, the Charles Bronfman Auditorium, as well as throughout Israel and the world. The IPO plays an average of 30-40 concerts aboard each year. Maestro Zubin Mehta has led the world-class symphonic ensemble as Music Director and Conductor for over 50 years. The IPO is unique in its cultural diversity, as members of the orchestra represent over 15 different nationalities, and were born, raised and educated in 17 different countries across three continents.

Website: https://www.ipo.co.il/

Visitor Information:
Ticket information: Tel Aviv Series: Regular Price: 180-550 NIS; Subscriber Price: 135-413 NIS; Jeans Concert Series: Regular Price: 150-420 NIS; Subscriber Price: 113-315 NIS; Friday Matinee Series: Regular Price: 170-490 NIS; Subscriber Price: 128-368 NIS; Haifa & Jerusalem Series: Regular Price: 130-430 NISSubscriber Price: 98-323 NIS; Chamber Music Concerts: 120 NIS; The IPO for Kids: Children: 60 NIS, Adults: 120 NIS

Street Address: Huberman St 1

 

Israel Symphony Orchestra Rishon LeZion (ISO)—Music

The municipality of Rishon LeZion founded the ISO in 1988. A year later, it became the resident orchestra of Tel Aviv’s Israeli Opera. The Music Director is James Judd, and the Director General is Ariel Cohen.

Website: http://www.isorl.co.il/   

Visitor Information: See website for ticketing information for upcoming performances.

Street Address: 16 Jabotinsky Street, Rishon LeZion

 

The Israeli Opera—Opera

Credit: Yossi Zwecker

The Israeli Opera, previously known as the New Israeli Opera, is Israel’s premier opera company. Founded in 1985, the company has had residency in the Tel Aviv Performing Arts Center since 1994. The Israeli Opera also founded the Israeli Opera Festival, which has performed large-scale outdoor productions, originally at Caesarea, and from 2010 at Masada. In order to cultivate the future generation of the Israeli Opera singers, the Israeli Opera established the Opera Studio program for young artists. Since its founding, the Israeli Opera has also commissioned and performed several operas by Israeli composers.

Website: http://www.israel-opera.co.il/eng/

Visitor Information: See website for ticketing information for upcoming productions. Subscriptions are also available for 2-5 operas (prices vary).

Street Address: 19 Shaul Hamelech Boulevard

 

Mayumana—Dance

Eylon Nuphar and Boaz Berman founded Mayumana in 1996. The company’s unique humor comes from its combination of skills, rhythm and visual effects. Over the past 15 years, Mayumana has performed in over 90 major cities around the world for over 7 million spectators. Its home theater, The Mayumana House, is located at the old harbor of Jaffa.

Website: http://www.mayumana.com/

Visitor Information: See website for ticketing information for upcoming productions.

Street Address: Yosef Yekutieli St 6

 

Nahum Gutman Museum of Art—Fine Arts

Credit: Tamarah

The Nahum Gutman Museum of Art is housed in the historic Writers’ Home, which was built in 1887 and was one of the first buildings in Tel Aviv’s Neve Tzedek neighborhood. The museum highlights the multi-dimensional work of the painter/sculptor for whom the museum is named. Tali Tamir  is currently the museum’s head curator.

Website: http://www.gutmanmuseum.co.il/

Visitor Information:
Hours: Monday-Thursday: 10:00am-4:00pm
Friday: 10:00am-2:00pm
Saturday: 10:00am-3:00pm

Entrance fee:  Adult: 24 NIS; Retiree: 12 NIS; Student: 12 NIS; Resident of Tel Aviv: 18 NIS; All ticket prices are 50% off on Fridays.

Street Address: Shimon Rokach 21

 

Nalaga’at Theater—Theater 

Adina Tal and Eran Gur founded Nalaga’at Theater in 2002, aiming to integrate deaf-blind people into general society, promote their needs and aspirations, and support their self-expression. Since its establishment, Nalaga’at Theater has provided an artistic and social experience that connects different communities without distinction of religion, race or cultural background. Nalaga’at Theater invites the public to meet people who are deaf-blind, creative, and independent. The theater’s shows include “Light is Heard in Zig Zag,” “Not by Bread Alone”, “Price Rooster,” “Say Orange,” and “Through the Spirit” (which features 7 deaf-blind actors along with seeing-hearing actors and interpreters). The center has also created and a sign language workshop called “Give me a Sign.”

Website: http://nalagaat.org.il/en/

Visitor Information: See website for ticketing information for upcoming productions.

Street Address: Second Aliyah Platform, Jaffa Port

 

Noa Dar Dance Group—Dance

Before founding the Noa Dar Dance Group, Noa Dar danced with Batsheva Dance Company, Merce Cunningham, and was a founding member of Tamar Dance Company. She established The Noa Dar Dance Group in Tel Aviv in 1993. The company’s dancers, musicians and visual artists all collaborate in the creative process. The company has been awarded the Minister of Culture Prize, the Rosenblum Prize from the city of Tel Aviv, and the Landau Prize from the National Lottery Council for the Arts. In addition to performing, the company conducts regular classes at The Noa Dar Studio, workshops and lecture demonstrations for dance students and the public.

Website: http://noadar.com

Visitor Information: See website for ticketing information for upcoming performances.

Street Address: 6 Kaplan Street

 

Pagoda House—Architectural Site

Credit: Michael D

Tucked away in the King Albert Square in Tel Aviv’s Lev Ha’ir district, the massive eclectic-style Pagoda House was designed in 1924 by Alexander Levy. It is currently owned by a Swedish magnate Robert Weil, who is now renovating the structure, which combines oriental and western motifs. The Pagoda House was notably the first private residence Tel Aviv to have an elevator.

Visitor Information: Visitation is free.

Street Address: Ge’ula St 40

 

Rothschild Tower—Architectural Site

Richard Meier & Partners’ Rothschild Tower rises 154 meters above Rothschild Boulevard in the center of the White City, which is celebrated for its 20th-century Bauhaus architecture. The tower is covered with white louvers that fit with its Bauhaus-era neighbors.

Website: http://www.meier.co.il/

Visitor Information: It is free to view the exterior of this residential tower. The public is not allowed inside.

Street Address: Rothschild Blvd 36

 

Sheketak—Dance

Zahi Patish and Danny Rachom founded Sheketak in 1997 to combine live music and dance. Today, Sheketak Productions is a company of over 25 artists, and their pieces have been performed in over 30 countries around the world. Their performances incorporate dance, circus, multimedia, theater, and video art.

Website: http://www.sheketak.com/en/

Visitor Information: See website for ticket information for upcoming performances.

 

Suzanne Dellal Centre—Dance

Established in 1989, the Suzanne Dellal Centre strives to cultivate, support, and promote contemporary dance in Israel. Since its founding, it has succeeded in positioning dance as a central part of Israeli culture. The Centre offers diverse performances, events, festivals, programs, and workshops. Its multi-level campus includes four performance halls, rehearsal studios, a restaurant and cafe, and wide plazas for outdoor performances and events. The Centre is home to the Batsheva Dance Company and Inbal Dance Theatre. In 2010, the Suzanne Dellal Centre was awarded the Israel Prize, the country’s most prestigious prize and highest honor.

Website: https://www.suzannedellal.org.il/en

Visitor Information: See website for ticketing information for upcoming performances.

Street Address: Yehieli St 5, Tel Aviv-Yafo, 6514946

 

Tel Aviv International Dance Festival—Dance

Credit: Jubal Battisti

The Tel Aviv International Dance Festival was established in 2006 as a combined initiative of the Suzanne Dellal Centre and the Israeli Opera with the Tel Aviv Municipality. The festival showcases both Israeli and international talent in the world of dance. Dance professionals from Israel and abroad present their work at the Suzanne Dellal Centre for Dance and the Israeli Opera in Tel Aviv.

Website: The Suzanne Dellal Centre website has updates on the festival: https://www.suzannedellal.org.il/

Visitor Information: See the Suzanne Dellal website for ticketing information for the upcoming festival.

Street Address: Suzanne Dellal Center for Dance and Theater. Yehieli St 5, Tel Aviv-Yafo, 6514946

 

Tel Aviv Jazz Festival—Music

The Tel Aviv Jazz Festival hosts internationally known jazz musicians in the Tel Aviv Cinematheque. It began in 1991, and runs each year for three days.

Website: https://www.facebook.com/telavivjazzfest/

Visitor Information: Check the festival Facebook page for ticketing updates for the upcoming performances.

Street Address: Cinemateque. Shprintsak Street 2

 

Tel Aviv Museum of Art—Architectural Site/Fine Arts

The Tel Aviv Museum of Art was established in 1932 in the home of Tel Aviv’s first mayor, Meir Dizengoff. In 1971, the museum moved to its current location on King Saul Avenue. The permanent collection includes leading artists from the first half of the 20th century, including Pablo Picasso, Jacques Lipchitz, Chaim Soutine, Albert Gleizes, Jean Metzinger, and Joan Miró. In 1989, Roy Lichtenstein created a giant two-panel mural especially for the museum, which now hangs in the entrance foyer.

The new wing of the Tel Aviv Museum of Art was opened in 2011. Israel’s diverse cultures inspired architect Preston Scott Cohen’s design, which utilizes overlapping axes to create a fascinating geometric shape. The museum’s interior architecture ensures natural light always enters the building, which creates optimal conditions for appreciating the art within.

Website: http://www.tamuseum.org.il/default.aspx

Visiting Information:
Hours: Monday, Wednesday, Saturday: 10:00am-6:00pm
Tuesday, Thursday: 10:00am-9:00pm
Friday: 10:00am-2:00pm

Ticket Information: Adult: 50 NIS; Tel Aviv resident: 40 NIS; Student: 40 NIS; Senior: 25 NIS; Enlisted soldier: 25 NIS; Child under 18: Free; Enlisted soldier in uniform: Free

Street Address: 27 Shaul Hamelech Blvd

 

Yasmeen Godder—Dance

Credit: Gadi Dagon

Yasmeen Godder was born and raised in Jerusalem, and moved to New York with her family at age eleven. She attended High School of Performing Arts in New York City, and received her BA from the Tisch School of the Arts at NYU. She has lived in Tel Aviv since 1999. Her choreography has been presented at Tel Aviv’s Suzanne Dellal Dance Center, New York’s Lincoln Center Festival, Hebbel Am Ufer in Berlin, the Place Theatre in London, and France’s Montpellier Dance Festival in France, among others. The company won the Ministry of Culture’s Prize for Small Ensemble for the performance of Singular Sensation.

Website: http://www.yasmeengodder.com/

Visitor Information: See website for ticketing information for upcoming performances.

Offered classes: Open Morning Class: Tuesday: 9:00am-10:45am; One class: 50 NIS a class; Five classes: 200 NIS; Ten classes: 350 NIS; Open morning Yoga Class:  Sunday and Thursday 9:00am – 10:15am; One class: 40 NIS; Six classes: 200 NIS; Contemporary Dance Classes for People living with Parkinson’s Disease: Monday: 11:30am-12:45pm; Wednesday: 10:30am-11:45am; One class: 60 NIS; Ten classes: 500 NIS

Street Address: Mandel Cultural Center. Hatkuma St. 1

 

Yiddishpiel—Theater

Credit: Gerard Allon/ Yiddishpiel Theater

Yiddishpiel is the only Yiddish theater company in Israel. Shmuel Atzmon-Wircer founded Yiddishpiel in 1987 to re-popularize Yiddish language and its culture. The theater’s repertoire includes the classic works of Sholem Aleichem, Abraham Goldfaden, Itzik Manger, Sholem Asch and Jacob Gordin, through Isaac Bashevis Singer, Shai Agnon, and others. All Yiddishpiel performances are performed in Yiddish and accompanied by translations into Hebrew, Russian and additional languages based on the performance’s location.

Website: http://www.yiddishpiel.co.il/en/

Visitor Information: See website for ticketing information for upcoming productions.

Street Address: Tzavta Theater. 30 Ibn Gabirol St.

 

Ramat Gan

The Museum of Israeli Art, Ramat-Gan—Fine Arts

Founded in 1987, the Ramat-Gan Museum of Israeli Art only displays Israeli art. The museum exhibits works of painting, sculpture, photography, video and 2 and 3 dimension design. The museum also has an education department that works with young audiences and gives guided tours of the museum.

Website: https://www.facebook.com/RGmuseum

Visitor Information:
Hours: Monday, Wednesday: 10:00am-4:00pm
Tuesday, Thursday: 10:00am-8:00pm
Friday: 9:00am-1:00pm
Saturday: 9:00am-3:00pm

Street Address: 146 Abba Hillel St.

 

Wohl Center—Architectural Site

The Wohl Center, which was completed in 2005, is a convention center in the main campus of Bar-Ilan University. Internationally renowned architect Daniel Libeskind and the local architecture firm Heder Partnership collaborated to design the building. In 2006, the Wohl Center won a RIBA International Award for its architecture. The center’s angular design is inspired by the shape of an open book, and Hebrew letters influenced the shapes of the windows, which cut across the gold-colored aluminum exterior.

Website: https://wohl-center.com/

Visitor Information: The conference rooms in the center are available for private events.

Street Address: Bar Ilan University, Ramat Gan

 

Petach Tikva

Petach Tikva Museum of Art—Fine Arts

Credit: Elad Sarig

The Petach Tikva Museum of Art is part of Petach Tikva’s Museum Complex. There are roughly 3,188 items in the museum, which was originally opened in 1964. It features works by Israeli and international artists in diverse media: painting, sculpture, photography, video, film, architecture, installation, and performance.

Website: http://www.petachtikvamuseum.com/en/

Visitor Information:
Hours: Monday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 10:00am-2:00pm
Tuesday, Thursday: 4:00pm-8:00pm
Guided tours are available upon request.

Street Address: Yad Labanim. 30 Arlozorov st.

 

Netanya

The Israel Netanya Kibbutz Orchestra—Music

The IKO, founded in 1970, performs approximately 120 concerts every season. The orchestra prides itself on its original programs that juxtapose classical repertoire with folk and jazz music. Christian Lindbergh is the principal conductor and music director.

Website: https://www.nko.co.il/en

Visitor Information: See website for ticketing information for upcoming performances.

Street Address: Israel-Netanya Kibbutz Orchestra, Netanya. P.O.B. 14090

 

Umm al-Fahm

Umm El-Fahem Art Gallery—Fine Arts

Credit: Moataz1997

Artist Sayid Abu Shaqra runs this Israeli-Arab art gallery, founded in 1996. The gallery houses Jewish and Arab artists’ works.

Website: https://www.ummelfahemgallery.com/

Visitor Information:
Hours: Sunday-Thursday, Saturday: 9:00am-4:00pm

Entrance fee: Adult: 15 NIS; Student: 10 NIS; Groups: 20 NIS; Children: Free. Guided tours are available upon request.

Street Address: Haifa St, Umm al-Fahm

 

Caesarea

Ralli Museum—Fine Arts

Credit: Ilya Borovok

The “Ralli Museum” refers to a conglomerate of two art museums of the same name in Caesarea. They are two of the five non-profit Ralli Museums that Harry Recanati established to display contemporary Latin American Art, commemorate the 15th century expulsion of Jews from Spain and Portugal, and preserve the history and art of Thessaloniki’s once prominent Jewish community. Ralli 1 includes works by Salvador Dali and Auguste Rodin, as well as Latin-American sculptures and paintings, and artifacts found in Caesarea from the Hellenistic, Roman, Byzantine, Islamic, and Crusades periods. Ralli 2 focuses on Spanish Jewry, and has a permanent collection of European paintings from 16th to 18th centuries that portray Biblical themes.

Website: https://www.rallimuseums.com/en/Ralli_Museums_Caesarea

Visitor Information:
Hours: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday: 10:30am-5:00pm
Friday: 10:30am-3:00pm
Holiday eves: 10:30am-12:30pm

Museum entrance is free.

Street Address: Rothschild Blv. (Next to the water tower). P.O. Box 4855 Caesarea 38900

 

Ein Hod

Janco-Dada Museum—Fine Arts

The Janco-Dada Museum, which was established in 1983, exhibits the work of Marcel Janco, the only Dadaist living in Israel at his time. The museum also features other art from the Dada movement, as well as contemporary art. The museum hosts approximately 20 changing exhibitions annually.

Website: http://www.jancodada.co.il/?lang=en

Visitor Information:
Hours: Sunday-Thursday: 10:00am-3:00pm
Friday/holiday eves: 10:00am-2:00pm
Saturday/holidays: 10:00am-3:30pm

Ticket Prices:  Adult: 24 NIS; Senior (with Israeli senior citizen card): 12 NIS; Children under 18: 12 NIS; Student, soldier: 12 NIS

Street Address: Ein Hod Artists’ Village, MP Hof Hacarmel 30890

 

Ein Harod

Mishkan Museum of Art —Fine Arts

Credit: Amit Geron

Mishkan Museum of Art was the first rural museum in Israel and the first museum run by a kibbutz. The museum is now one of Israel’s premier art institutions, and the largest museum in Northern Israel. The collection includes Jewish liturgical work and works from the nineteenth century through the present.

Website: http://museumeinharod.org.il/en/

Visitor Information:
Hours: Sunday-Thursday: 9:00am-4:30pm
Friday/holiday eves: 9:00am-1:00pm
Saturday/holidays: 10:00am-4:30pm

Ticket Prices:  Adult: 40 NIS; Senior: 20 NIS; Student: 20 NIS; Children 6-18: 10 NIS; Solider and National Service: 20 NIS; Visitor with disability: 20 NIS

Street Address: Road # 71 >Tel Yosef Junction > (Left turn from Afula, Right turn from Bet Shean)> Continue up the mountain > Turn Left at the third traffic circle

 

Haifa

Haifa Museum of Art—Fine Arts

Credit: PR

Established in 1951, the Haifa Museum of Art is Israel’s third largest art museum. Its collection of over 7,000 items focuses on Israeli and international contemporary art. It falls under the auspices of the Haifa Museums along with the Mané Catz Museum (dedicated to paintings from the School of Paris and Jewish artifacts) and the City Museum of Haifan History.

Website: http://www.hma.org.il/eng

Visitor Information:
Hours: Sunday-Wednesday: 10:00am-4:00pm
Thursday: 4:00pm-7:00pm
Friday: 10:00am-1:00pm
Saturday: 10:00am-3:00pm

Ticket Prices:  Adult: 45 NIS; Youth/Soldier/Police officer/Student: 30 NIS; Senior: 22.5 NIS; Visitor with disabilities: 30 NIS; Family (couple and two children): 90 NIS

Street Address: Shabtai Levi St 26, Haifa, 3304331

 

The Haifa Symphony Orchestra—Music

Credit: Eran Lavi

The Haifa Symphony Orchestra, the most significant musical institution in the north of Israel, was founded in 1950. Maestro Noam Sheriff is its current music director.  The orchestra offers six programs: The Classical Series, The Vocal Series, Haifa Proms, Friday Morning Classics, The Children’s Series & The Chamber Music Series.

Website: Haifa Symphony Orchestra

Visitor Information: See website for ticketing information for upcoming performances.

Street Address: Mahanayim St 7, Haifa

 

Haifa Theater—Theater

Credit: Zvi Roger – Haifa Municipality – The Spokesperson, Publicity and Advertising Division

Haifa mayor Abba Hushi established the Haifa Theater, Israel’s first municipal theater, in 1961. The theater company performs eight to ten plays a year, which have a reputation for being provocative, to a subscription audience of more than 30,000. The company tours throughout Israel’s cities, kibbutzim and settlements. The troupe’s home base is at the Joseph and Rebecca Meyerhoff Theater of Haifa in Haifa’s Hadar Hacarmel neighborhood.

Website: https://www.ht1.co.il/

Visitor Information: See website for ticketing information for upcoming productions.

Street Address: Pevzner St 50, Haifa, 33134

 

Reuben and Edith Hecht Museum—Fine Arts

Founded in 1984, the Reuben and Edith Hecht Museum is located on the grounds of the University of Haifa. Its exhibits display the archaeology and history of the land of Israel from the Chalcolithic period to the Byzantine period. The museum’s art collection includes French painting from the Impressionism, Post-impressionism, and the School of Paris movements, as well as Jewish art from mid-nineteenth to early twentieth century. The museum boasts paintings by Édouard Manet, Claude Monet, Camille Jacob Pissarro, Vincent van Gogh, and Max Liebermann. The museum also has an acoustic auditorium with 380 seats and a pipe organ built by Gideon Shamir.

Website: http://mushecht.haifa.ac.il/Default_eng.aspx

Visitor Information:
Hours: Sunday, Monday, Wednesday, Thursday: 10:00am-4:00pm
Tuesday: 10:00-7:00pm
Friday: 10:00am-1:00pm
Saturday: 10:00am-2:00pm

Free tours are available in English, Hebrew, Arabic, and Spanish.

Street Address: 199 Aba-Hushi Avenue Mount Carmel, Haifa

 

Tikotin Museum of Japanese Art—Fine Arts

This museum, located on Mount Carmel, is the only museum dedicated to the preservation and exhibition of Japanese art in the Middle East. Felix Tikotin and Abba Hushi, then mayor of Haifa, established the museum in 1959. The museum’s collection includes some 7,000 items mainly from the 17th to 19th centuries, as well as a collection of modern Japanese art.

Website: http://www.tmja.org.il/eng

Visitor Information:
Hours: Sunday-Thursday: 10:00am-7:00pm
Friday: 10:00am-1:00pm
Saturday: 10:00am-7:00pm

Ticket Prices:  Adult: 35 NIS; Child/Soldier/Police Officer/Student: 23 NIS; Senior: 17.5 NIS; Visitor with disabilities: 23 NIS; Family (couple and two children): 90 NIS

Street Address: HaNassi Blvd 89

 

Kibbutz Ga’aton

Kibbutz Contemporary Dance Company—Dance

Credit: Eyal Hirsch

Rami Be’er is the Artistic Director of Kibbutz Contemporary Dance Company (KCDC), one of the world’s leading dance companies. In 1973, KCDC was founded by Yehudit Arnon, who established the International Dance Village. With its technically strong and physically eclectic cast of dancers, KCDC performs worldwide.

Website: http://www.kcdc.co.il/en/

Visitor Information: See website for ticketing information for upcoming performances. To schedule a visit to the International Dance Village, contact Ayelet Ghez: ayelet@kcdc.co.il

Street Address: Ga’aton Ga’aton, 25130